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Comparing the Racial Politics of the IWW in South Africa and the United States, 1905-1925

category international | history of anarchism | opinion / analysis author Monday August 08, 2011 18:21author by Red and Black Action Report this post to the editors

This recent article in an academic journal examines how the revolutionary syndicalist IWW (an integral part of the broad anarchist tradition) sought to marry class struggles with struggles against racial and national oppression through the One Big Union. This story is an important part of the history of the global working class, but has been marginalised in the literature, in part because of the myth that left anti-racism started with Marxist communism in the 1920s. This paper recovers a history of revolutionary unionism and politics amongst workers of colour, and of their organisations, and it shows that the broad anarchist tradition played an important role in struggles for national liberation and racial equality.

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Peter Cole & Lucien van der Walt

"Crossing the Color Lines, Crossing the Continents: Comparing the Racial Politics of the IWW in South Africa and the United States, 1905- ­1925," Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies, Vol. 12, No. 1, January 2011, 69­-96

ABSTRACT

In two of the planet’s most highly racialized countries, South Africa and the United States, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW, or “Wobblies”), were remarkable. A key revolutionary syndicalist current operating globally, aspiring to unite the world's working class into a revolutionary One Big Union against capitalism, the state and economic and social inequality, the Wobblies operated in contexts characterized by white supremacy and deeply divided working classes. Yet they not only condemned racism and segregation in theory, but actively engaged in the challenging work of organizing workers of color including black Africans, African Americans, Asians, Coloureds and Latinos, against both economic exploitation and national/ racial oppression.

Although the literature on race, ethnicity, and labour in both countries is voluminous, remarkably little has been written regarding the IWW on race matters. Yet the Wobbly tradition’s impressive commitment and achievements largely unappreciated; the myth that left anti-racism started with Marxist communism in the 1920s remains pervasive. This article develops a comparative analysis of these two IWW experiences, bridging the North/South and industrialized/developing country divides in the (labor) historiography, and deepening our understanding of IWW politics and of labor, race and the left in countries with heterogeneous working classes.

Given the centrality of sailors and dockers in the Wobbly movement, particular attention is paid to Philadelphia (US) and Cape Town (SA). In short, this article seeks to correct omissions in the literature of both countries’ labor and left movements by exploring how and why the IWW did what so few other unions were willing or able to do―organize across the color line, reject working class and official racism, with both remarkable achievements (if some limitations) in its emancipatory project.

In doing so, this paper recovers a history of revolutionary unionism and politics amongst workers of colour, and of their organisations, like the General Workers Union, IWW, Industrial Workers of Africa, Industrial Social League, and the Industrial and Commercial Workers Union of Africa. The broad anarchist tradition, including syndicalism, thus played an important role in struggles for national liberation and racial equality.

Key words:

anarchism, Bakunin, Black struggles, Cape Town, communism, colonialism, dockers, Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), global labour, labor unions, Kropotkin, longshore workers, Philadelphia, race relations, sailors, strikes, South Africa, syndicalism, transnational labour, United States

LINKS
Online at Scribd http://www.scribd.com/doc/61059412/Cole-Van-Der-Walt-Co...-1925
Online at Googledocs https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=...en_US

Related Link: https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=...en_US

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