user preferences

New Events

North America / Mexico

no event posted in the last week

A Conservative Threat Offers New Opportunities for Working Class Feminism

category north america / mexico | gender | feature author Tuesday February 07, 2017 15:31author by Romina Akemi and Bree Busk - Black Rose Anarchist Federation Report this post to the editors

featured image
"When women rise, the people advance"

In the first week of Donald Trump’s presidency, there were two important mobilizations that expressed radically different views on reproductive rights. The Women’s March on Washington, which took place the day after Trump’s inauguration, has been hailed as one of the largest mobilizations in US history. What began as a spontaneous call quickly ballooned into a movement that tapped into growing anxieties over the intentions of the new administration. The march drew some 500,000 to rally in Washington DC while sister marches were held across the country and even worldwide. One week later, another mobilization took place: the annual March for Life. While significantly smaller, this march still drew many attendees who were energized by celebrity speakers from the Trump administration.

At this point, there is no certainty that the Women’s March will evolve into an actual social movement. This much is clear: the Women’s March represents a political opening to rebuild a revolutionary feminist movement (in conjunction with other developing struggles) that advances demands to improve the lives of working people and embraces conflict with the liberal, capitalist character of the feminist movement of the day.

[Castellano]

A CONSERVATIVE THREAT OFFERS NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORKING CLASS FEMINISM

by Romina Akemi and Bree Busk

Author Note: This article was written by Romina Akemi and Bree Busk for Solidaridad, the newspaper of the Chilean organization Solidaridad – Federación Comunista Libertaria. For this reason, more time is spent explaining history and concepts that would be familiar to a US audience.

In the first week of Donald Trump’s presidency, there were two important mobilizations that expressed radically different views on reproductive rights. The Women’s March on Washington, which took place the day after Trump’s inauguration, has been hailed as one of the largest mobilizations in US history. What began as a spontaneous call quickly ballooned into a movement that tapped into growing anxieties over the intentions of the new administration. The march drew some 500,000 to rally in Washington DC while sister marches were held across the country and even worldwide. One week later, on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade (the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion), another mobilization took place: the annual March for Life. While significantly smaller, this march still drew many attendees who were energized by celebrity speakers from the Trump administration. In a break with political protocol, Vice President Mike Pence, a former Catholic turned born-again Christian, spoke at the rally, where he claimed, “Life is winning again in America.”

In the United States, the legality of abortion rests on Roe v. Wade, which can only be overturned by another Supreme Court ruling. However, there is a vacancy on the Supreme Court that President Obama was unable to fill in his final term. During his campaign, then-candidate Trump had committed to appointing an anti-abortion judge, a promise that was reiterated during Pence’s speech and finally realized on January 30th with the nomination of Neil Gorsuch. A recent report on Judge Gorsuch’s voting record states that if confirmed, he would likely be a reliable conservative, “voting to limit gay rights, uphold restrictions on abortion and invalidate affirmative action programs.”

Despite its legality, abortion access in the US has continued to be precarious and uneven, especially for those in rural communities. This is due in part to the success of the anti-abortion movement, which has persistently sought both legal and grassroots methods to reduce and restrict access. This was most visible in the 1990’s, when right-wing evangelical organizations such as Operation Rescue, Moral Majority, and the Family Research Council came into prominence. These organizations rode the conservative backlash against the ‘60s “cultural revolution,” demanding open prayer in state schools, opposing sex education, and shutting down women’s clinics. This period of religious conservative response to secular, progressive values came to be known as the Culture Wars. At this point, the Third Wave of the US feminist movement had been fully institutionalized within the Democratic Party and was unable to defend its gains against such a challenge.

The Women’s March was the most powerful public demonstration in defense of reproductive rights in recent history and represented the first call to action capable of uniting women across class, racial, and political lines since the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment in the late 1970’s. For the last decade, US Left politics have been dominated by identity politics: a political theory that emphasizes racial, gender, and sexual identity over social class. Identity politics was initially employed to analyze and deconstruct manifestations of white supremacy and patriarchy within leftist organizations and movements, but it was also taken up by young progressives in academic and institutional settings. Within this analysis, class became understood as another identity that could be discriminated against rather than a relationship to the means of production. What began as a useful tool to analyze power imbalances soon evolved into an ideological position characterized by disunity, extreme localism, and separatism. These political behaviors have had a broad influence on both the revolutionary and institutional left in the US, impeding the growth of broad-based social movements. The fragmentary nature of identity politics was addressed through the application of intersectionality, the theoretical practice of analyzing overlapping social identities and related systems of oppression, domination, or discrimination. Intersectionality was intended to provide a model for inclusive, horizontal cooperation within organizations and movements across all identities. However, in practice, activists interpreted it to mean that all identities and oppressions are situated equally and no special understanding of capitalism or the state was necessary to complete their analysis. As the recent US election has demonstrated, most people will react to threats to their material realities rather than in response to purely ideological considerations about their place within the complex hierarchy of oppressed identities . . . The irony being that politics from above – led by Trump – has forced the US Left to find unity, when a few months ago, they saw none.

At this point, there is no certainty that the Women’s March will evolve into an actual social movement. Across the country, the microphones were dominated by Democratic Party politicians and liberal celebrities who emphasized institutional resistance. In contrast, the march participants were politically diverse, with some demanding reforms and others, revolution. The unifying factor was a collective desire to ignite an ongoing resistance in the streets to the coming social rollbacks. Revolutionary feminists have only just begun to assert themselves in these political spaces and it’s unclear what role they will ultimately play. This much is clear: the Women’s March represents a political opening to rebuild a revolutionary feminist movement (in conjunction with other developing struggles) that advances demands to improve the lives of working people and embraces conflict with the liberal, capitalist character of the feminist movement of the day. There is a clear opportunity to re-center the classic demands of reproductive justice, economic equality, and freedom from patriarchal violence, and to push them forward with a greater force than was possible in decades past. Our efforts will require the best aspects of intersectional analysis to prevent us from replicating the hierarchies we wish to abolish, but that is only the beginning: we must address the material reality of those most directly impacted by patriarchal-capitalism and let that focus serve as a guide for the revolutionary movement we wish to build.

Related Link: http://www.blackrosefed.org/
author by Alternativa Libertaria/FdCA - Ufficio Relazioni Internazionalipublication date Wed Feb 15, 2017 01:44Report this post to the editors

Una minaccia conservatrice crea nuove opportunità per un femminismo di classe

"Nella prima settimana di presidenza di Donald Trump hanno avuto luogo due importanti mobilitazioni, espressione di due visioni radicalmente distinte sui diritti riproduttivi. La marcia delle donne a Washington nel giorno seguente all'insediamento di Trump è stata una delle manifestazioni più partecipate nella storia degli Stati Uniti. Ciò che era cominciato come una chiamata spontanea è cresciuto rapidamente fino a diventare un movimento rappresentativo della crescente preoccupazione nei confronti del programma del nuovo governo. La marcia ha riunito circa 500.000 persone a Washington D.C, con manifestazioni parallele in tutto il paese e nel resto del mondo. Una settimana dopo, ha avuto luogo una mobilitazione molto diversa: la marcia annuale per la vita. Nonostante questa sia stata considerabilmente minore, ha riunito comunque un buon numero di persone, inclusi personaggi noti del governo Trump.

In questo momento non esiste nessuna certezza che la marcia delle donne si possa trasformare in un movimento sociale legittimo. Ciò che risulta chiaro è che la marcia delle donne rappresenta un'opportunità politica per ricostruire un movimento femminista libertario (insieme ad altre lotte che si stanno sviluppando) che ponga domande finalizzate a migliorare la vita dei lavoratori e che si opponga al carattere liberale e capitalista del movimento femminista attuale."

UNA MINACCIA CONSERVATRICE CREA NUOVE OPPORTUNITÀ PER UN FEMMINISMO DI CLASSE

Nota delle autrici: questo articolo è stato redatto da Romina Akemi e Bree Busk per Solidaridad, il giornale della organizzazione cilena Solidaridad-Federación Comunista Libertaria. Per questo motivo, alcuni concetti e fatti storici che risultano familiari ai lettori statunitensi vengono spiegati più dettagliatamente.

Nella prima settimana di presidenza di Donald Trump hanno avuto luogo due importanti mobilitazioni, espressione di due visioni radicalmente distinte sui diritti riproduttivi.

La marcia delle donne a Washington nel giorno seguente all'insediamento di Trump è stata una delle manifestazioni più partecipate nella storia degli Stati Uniti. Quello che è cominciato come una chiamata spontanea è cresciuta rapidamente fino a diventare un movimento rappresentativo della crescente preoccupazione nei confronti del programma del nuovo governo. La marcia ha riunito circa 500.000 persone a Washington D.C, con manifestazioni parallele in tutto il paese e nel resto del mondo. Una settimana dopo, ha avuto luogo una mobilitazione molto diversa: la marcia annuale per la vita.

Nonostante questa sia stata considerabilmente minore, ha riunito comunque un buon numero di persone, inclusi personaggi noti del governo Trump. Rompendo il protocollo politico tradizionale, il vicepresidente Mike Pence, un ex-cattolico convertito al cristianesimo evangelico, ha parlato durante la manifestazione dichiarando: "La vita sta vincendo di nuovo negli Stati Uniti".

Negli Stati Uniti, la legalità dell'aborto è affidata alla Roe. v. Wade, una sentenza del 1973 che può essere riconosciuta solo da una nuova decisione della Corte Suprema. Attualmente vi è un vuoto legislativo che il presidente Obama non è stato in grado di riempire nel suo mandato. Durante la sua campagna elettorale il candidato successore Donald Trump aveva espresso l'intenzione di nominare un giudice antiabortista, promessa che è stata ripetuta da Pence e finalmente realizzata il 30 di gennaio con la nomina di Neil Gorsuch. Se verrà confermato il rapporto pubblicato recentemente sulle vicende che hanno portato all'elezione del giudice Gorsuch, la direzione sarà quella di una svolta conservatrice, "votando per limitare i diritti degli omosessuali, mantenere restrizioni sull'aborto e invalidare i programmi di azione positiva (affirmative action)".

Nonostante sia legale, l'accesso all'aborto continua ad esser precario e discontinuo negli Stati Uniti, specialmente per gli abitanti delle comunità rurali. Questo è dovuto in parte al successo del movimento antiabortista, che si è servito di metodi legali o dal basso per ridurre l'accesso all'aborto. Questa tendenza è divenuta particolarmente evidente negli anni '90, quando organizzazioni evangeliche di destra come Operation Rescue, Moral Majority, and the Family Research Council hanno acquisito maggiore importanza. Queste organizzazioni hanno cavalcato la reazione conservatrice di fronte alla rivoluzione culturale degli anni '60, esigendo che si pregasse nelle scuole pubbliche, opponendosi all'educazione sessuale e chiudendo le cliniche per donne. Questo periodo di opposizione tra il conservatorismo religioso e i valori progressisti secolari è chiamato la "Guerra culturale" ("The cultural wars"). In quell'epoca il movimento femminista nordamericano della terza onda era già completamente istituzionalizzato dentro al Partito democratico, e non è stato possibile difendere le conquiste già fatte di fronte ad una tale opposizione.

La marcia delle donne è stata la dimostrazione pubblica in difesa dei diritti riproduttivi più importante nella storia recente. Essa rappresenta la prima chiamata ad un'azione capace di unire trasversalmente donne di ogni razza, classe e tendenza politica dalla sconfitta dell'emendamento sulla legge paritaria (Equal Rights Amendment) della fine degli anni '70. Durante l'ultima decade, le politiche di sinistra negli Stati Uniti sono state dominate dalla politica dell'identità: una teoria politica che enfatizza l'identità razziale, sessuale e di genere a discapito della classe sociale. Le politiche dell'identità inizialmente contribuirono all'analisi e alla decontrazione delle manifestazioni di supremazia bianca e di patriarcato all'interno di organizzazioni e movimenti di sinistra, ma furono adottate presto dai giovani progressisti in ambito accademico. All'interno di questa analisi, il concetto di classe s'intende come un'identità in più, soggetta ad essere discriminata però non sulla base della sua relazione con i mezzi di produzione.

Ciò che era inizialmente uno strumento utile per l'analisi dei disequilibri del potere finì per trasformarsi in una posizione ideologica caratterizzata dalla disunione, dal separatismo e da un localismo estremo. Questi comportamenti politici hanno influenzato fortemente le sinistre istituzionali e rivoluzionarie negli Stati Uniti, bloccando la crescita di movimenti sociali ad ampia base.

Il problema della natura frammentaria della politica dell'identità è stato affrontato mediante l'applicazione del concetto di intersezionalità, una pratica teorica che contiene l'analisi delle identità sociali sovrapposte e dei loro corrispondenti sistemi di oppressione, dominio o di discriminazione. L'intersezionalità è stata pensata per preparare un modello che promuovesse una cooperazione orizzontale e inclusiva all'interno dei movimenti e delle organizzazioni tra le diverse identità. Senza dubbio nella pratica gli attivisti finirono per seguire l'interpretazione secondo la quale tutte le identità e tutte le oppressioni sono collocabili sullo stesso piano, e non si richiede nessun giudizio particolare al capitalismo o allo Stato per completare l'analisi. Come dimostrato nella recenti elezioni negli Stati Uniti, la maggior parte delle persone reagisce alle minacce contro la sua realtà materiale e non in base a considerazioni puramente ideologiche sulla propria collocazione nella complessa gerarchia delle identità oppresse…risulta ironico che la politica "dall'alto" condotta da Trump abbia finito per costringere la sinistra statunitense ad incontrare un'unità che, appena un mese fa, brillava per la sua assenza.

In questo momento non esiste alcuna certezza che la marcia delle donne si possa trasformare in un movimento sociale legittimo. In tutto il paese, i microfoni sono stati monopolizzati dai politici democratici e da celebrità liberali, mettendo l'accento sulla resistenza istituzionale. Questo contrasta con la diversità politica dei partecipanti alla marcia: alcuni esigono riforme, mentre altri chiamano alla rivoluzione. Il fattore unificante è il desiderio collettivo di iniziare una resistenza nelle strade di fronte alla regressione sociale che si sta annunciando. Le femministe rivoluzionarie hanno appena iniziato ad inserirsi in questi spazi politici e il ruolo che ricopriranno non è ancora chiaro. Ciò che risulta chiaro è che la marcia delle donne rappresenta un'opportunità politica per ricostruire un movimento femminista libertario (insieme ad altre lotte che si stanno sviluppando) che ponga domande finalizzate a migliorare la vita dei lavoratori e che si opponga al carattere liberale e capitalista del movimento femminista attuale. Esiste una chiara opportunità per riportare l'attenzione sulle domande classiche di giustizia riproduttiva, uguaglianza economica e fine della violenza patriarcale, e per porre nuove domande con una forza maggiore rispetto ai decenni passati. I nostri sforzi necessiteranno degli elementi migliori dell'analisi intersezionale per impedire che si sviluppino di nuovo le gerarchie che cerchiamo di abolire, però questo è solo il principio. Dobbiamo riconoscere la realtà materiale di coloro che vengono direttamente impattati dal capitalismo patriarcale, e lasciare che questa prospettiva ci guidi nel movimento rivoluzionario che vogliamo costruire.

Link esterno: http://www.blackrosefed.org/

(traduzione a cura di Alternativa Libertaria/fdca - Ufficio Relazioni Internazionali)

 
This page can be viewed in
English Italiano Deutsch
¿Què està passant a Catalunya?

Front page

Hands off the anarchist movement ! Solidarity with the FAG and the anarchists in Brazil !

URGENTE! Contra A Criminalização, Rodear De Solidariedade Aos Que Lutam!

¡Santiago Maldonado Vive!

Catalunya como oportunidad (para el resto del estado)

La sangre de Llorente, Tumaco: masacre e infamia

Triem Lluitar, El 3 D’octubre Totes I Tots A La Vaga General

¿Què està passant a Catalunya?

Loi travail 2017 : Tout le pouvoir aux patrons !

En Allemagne et ailleurs, la répression ne nous fera pas taire !

El acuerdo en preparacion entre la Union Europea y Libia es un crimen de lesa humanidad

Mourn the Dead, Fight Like Hell for the Living

SAFTU: The tragedy and (hopefully not) the farce

Anarchism, Ethics and Justice: The Michael Schmidt Case

Land, law and decades of devastating douchebaggery

Democracia direta já! Barrar as reformas nas ruas e construir o Poder Popular!

Reseña del libro de José Luis Carretero Miramar “Eduardo Barriobero: Las Luchas de un Jabalí” (Queimada Ediciones, 2017)

Análise da crise política do início da queda do governo Temer

Dès maintenant, passons de la défiance à la résistance sociale !

17 maggio, giornata internazionale contro l’omofobia.

Los Mártires de Chicago: historia de un crimen de clase en la tierra de la “democracia y la libertad”

Strike in Cachoeirinha

(Bielorrusia) ¡Libertad inmediata a nuestro compañero Mikola Dziadok!

DAF’ın Referandum Üzerine Birinci Bildirisi:

Cajamarca, Tolima: consulta popular y disputa por el territorio

© 2005-2017 Anarkismo.net. Unless otherwise stated by the author, all content is free for non-commercial reuse, reprint, and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere. Opinions are those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by Anarkismo.net. [ Disclaimer | Privacy ]