user preferences

New Events

North America / Mexico

no event posted in the last week

Carlo Tresca: Portrait of a Rebel

category north america / mexico | history of anarchism | feature author Wednesday May 10, 2006 05:27author by Anarcho Report this post to the editors

Carlo Tresca was a newspaper editor (editing "Il Martello" --The Hammer-- for over 20 years), a passionate and powerful writer, an agitator as well as an organiser. He was happiest in the struggle, taking up any call for his help in encouraging Italian workers to strike and fight. His agitation was legendary, including the victorious strike in Lawrence (1912), the Little Falls, New York textile workers' strike (1912), the New York City hotel workers' strike (1913), the Paterson, New Jersey silk workers' strike (1913), and the Mesabi Range, Minnesota, miners' strike (1916).

[Ellenika]


Review: Carlo Tresca: Portrait of a Rebel

Carlo Tresca: Portrait of a Rebel
Nunzio Pernicone
Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1403964785


Carlo Tresca is one of those rebel workers whose memory deserves to be honoured and Pernicone's excellent biography does just that. Pernicone's has previously produced an excellent history of the Italian anarchist movement ("Italian Anarchism: 1864-1892", Princeton University Press, 1993) and this work is of equal quality and of interest to anarchists. He obviously understands anarchism and writes with sympathy and knowledge about it. Such historians are rare.

Tresca was born to a middle-class family in Italy in the 1879. He soon became a socialist and became active in the Italian Railroad Workers' Federation before emigrating to America at the age of 25. Once there he was elected secretary of the Italian Socialist Federation of North America and he took a full part in the class struggle. He switched political sympathies from social democracy to syndicalism as he realised the inherent reformism of the former and the importance of the direct action of the latter. He become associated with the IWW, taking part in strikes of Pennsylvania coal miners before becoming involved in many important (even legendary) industrial disputes. Overtime his syndicalism turned into anarcho-syndicalism and he became one of the leading anarchists in America, particularly in the Italian-American community.

Pernicone paints a picture of a deeply colourful and charismatic figure who played a key role in numerous fights for workers' rights. He was a newspaper editor (editing "Il Martello" -- The Hammer -- for over 20 years), a passionate and powerful writer, an agitator as well as an organiser. He was happiest in the struggle, taking up any call for his help in encouraging Italian workers to strike and fight. His agitation was legendary, including the victorious strike in Lawrence (1912), the Little Falls, New York textile workers' strike (1912), the New York City hotel workers' strike (1913), the Paterson, New Jersey silk workers' strike (1913), and the Mesabi Range, Minnesota, miners' strike (1916). He also played an important role in the unsuccessful attempt to save Sacco and Vanzetti.

After the First World War, Tresca turned his fire against both fascism and Leninist/Stalinist tyranny. He was an early and passionate opponent of fascism, quickly becoming the leading anti-fascist in America. His activities earned the hatred of Mussolini and his regime as he played a key role (both politically and physically) in stopping the spread of fascism in Italian-American communities (they tried to blow him up in 1926). Pernicone recounts in much detail how willing the "democratic" American state was to help Fascist Italy by trying to expel Tresca. He also recounts how Tresca used to send Mussolini a telegram on the latter's birthday. Before emigrating to America, the youthful Tresca had meet with Mussolini (then a left-socialist leader) only to be informed that being in America would turn Tresca into a real revolutionary. Tresca's telegram simply reminded Mussolini that he had been right!

Unlike many during that period, Tresca had no illusions in the Soviet Union. He saw how Lenin's regime had crushed the real revolution in Russia and opposed the new "socialist" regime as vigorously as he did fascism. During the 1920s, however, Tresca did try to work with all opponents of fascism, even the communists (Tresca did not doubt the bravery of the rank and file and recognised their willingness to fight fascism). His attempts to build anti-fascist united fronts are recounted in some detail by Pernicone, as is Stalinist attempts to control such bodies. This, along with the Stalinist counter-revolutionary role in the Spanish Revolution, caused Tresca's anti-Leninism to grow during the 1930s until such time as he opposed any form of co-operation with the Stalinists. This earned him their hatred.

Tresca's fight for freedom, equality and solidarity continued right to his assassination at the age of 63. While no one was ever prosecuted for the murder, Pernicone does a good job in evaluating the evidence and conflicting theories (suspects include the Stalinists, the Fascists and the Mafia) before pointing the finger at Mafioso Carmine Galante. Suffice to say, the title of a previous biography of Tresca definitely summed up his life: "All the right enemies"!

This biography is the product of over thirty years work and the author clearly admires Tresca. However, this is no whitewash and the book shows the flaws as well as strengths of this untiring and fearless champion of liberty and justice. This is a riveting book and not only brings to life Tresca's only amazing story but brings to life the world of radical politics of the time.

One thing which does strike the reader is how sectarian the anarchist movement was at the time. Tresca was hated by the anti-organisationalist anarchists who followed Luigi Galleani and they stopped at nothing to smear him (much to the joy of the Fascists in the 1920s and 30s). Letters from Malatesta, Goldman nor Berkman could not stop the personal attacks. It seems strange to see how, today, a similar process is at work with anti-organisationalist anarchists (such as primitivists) indulging in similar attacks. It would be nice to think we could learn some lessons of the past!

In summary, this is a very interesting book and well recommended. Tresca's memory should be honoured by all fighters for freedom today and Pernicone has done both Tresca and our movement a great service in writing this biography of an undeservingly forgotten champion of freedom. May it inspire many more!


author by Thinkerpublication date Sat May 13, 2006 10:10Report this post to the editors

"Tresca was hated by the anti-organisationalist anarchists who followed Luigi Galleani and they stopped at nothing to smear him (much to the joy of the Fascists in the 1920s and 30s)."

According to Paul Avrich, the American Galleanists engaged in physical fights with Italian-American fascists during this time period (after Sacco and Vanzetti's execution) and also went to Spain to help fight the fascists there.

author by Think againpublication date Sat May 13, 2006 18:42Report this post to the editors

Well, I applaud their efforts. But the same could be said of the CP, but it doesn't redeem them.

author by Phebus - NEFACpublication date Tue May 23, 2006 21:40Report this post to the editors

I dont think the author of the review was implying that the antiorganisationalists where allying with the fascists or where not good antifascists figthers, just that their smear campain did play into the fascists games.

author by Thinkerpublication date Sat Jun 24, 2006 06:23Report this post to the editors

How did they smear Tresca? I assume there's something in the book about this.

How did this "smear campaign" play into the fascists games? What does that mean?

author by mitch - Workers Solidarity Alliancepublication date Mon Aug 28, 2006 12:35author email wsany at hotmail dot comReport this post to the editors

W.S.A. will co-sponsor a public forum with Nunzio Pernicone on his book "Carlo Tresca: Portrait of a Rebel".

WHEN: 6 PM Thursday, September 21, 2006

WHERE: United Federation of Teachers
50 Broadway - 2nd Floor
New York City

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC - PLEASE CIRCULATE WIDELY

Info: 212-998-2636


The event is being sponsored by the N.Y. Labor History Association. Other co-sponsors include the UFT-Italian-American Heritage Committee, Tamiment Library-NYU, the Libertarian Book Club and the Workers Solidarity Alliance

author by Trescapublication date Wed Aug 30, 2006 06:15Report this post to the editors

In the book "All the Right Enemies: The Life and Murder of Carlo Tresca" by Dorothy Gallagher, Tresca is said to have testified in court that he was not an anarchist, to have socialized with cops when they came to see him, to have been suspected of stealing funds from the Sacco and Vanzetti defence fund and having gotten angry when it was suggested that support funds be sent directly to the defence committee instead of him, to have assigned a lawyer to Sacco and Vanzetti whom Sacco would soon declare his enemy and write to saying he would like see the lawyer dead, and to have testified in court for the United States government against a communist.

I don't know how accurate Gallagher's information is, but this sheds a little light as to the "slander" from Cronaca Sovversiva anarchists, who initially supported Tresca by attending the trial where he declared he wasn't an anarchist.

author by W.S.A.publication date Mon Sep 18, 2006 21:56Report this post to the editors

NYC: Come here Nunzio Pernicone

W.S.A. will co-sponsor a public forum with Nunzio Pernicone on his book "Carlo Tresca: Portrait of a Rebel".

WHEN: 6 PM Thursday, September 21, 2006

WHERE: United Federation of Teachers
50 Broadway - 2nd Floor
New York City

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC - PLEASE CIRCULATE WIDELY

Info: 212-998-2636


The event is being sponsored by the N.Y. Labor History Association. Other co-sponsors include the UFT-Italian-American Heritage Committee, Tamiment Library-NYU, the Libertarian Book Club and the Workers Solidarity Alliance


******************************
Workers Solidarity Alliance
339 Lafayette Street-Room 202
New York, NY 10012
tel. (212) 979-8353

www.workersolidarity.org

Number of comments per page
  
 
This page can be viewed in
English Italiano Deutsch
¿Què està passant a Catalunya?

Front page

Hands off the anarchist movement ! Solidarity with the FAG and the anarchists in Brazil !

URGENTE! Contra A Criminalização, Rodear De Solidariedade Aos Que Lutam!

¡Santiago Maldonado Vive!

Catalunya como oportunidad (para el resto del estado)

La sangre de Llorente, Tumaco: masacre e infamia

Triem Lluitar, El 3 D’octubre Totes I Tots A La Vaga General

¿Què està passant a Catalunya?

Loi travail 2017 : Tout le pouvoir aux patrons !

En Allemagne et ailleurs, la répression ne nous fera pas taire !

El acuerdo en preparacion entre la Union Europea y Libia es un crimen de lesa humanidad

Mourn the Dead, Fight Like Hell for the Living

SAFTU: The tragedy and (hopefully not) the farce

Anarchism, Ethics and Justice: The Michael Schmidt Case

Land, law and decades of devastating douchebaggery

Democracia direta já! Barrar as reformas nas ruas e construir o Poder Popular!

Reseña del libro de José Luis Carretero Miramar “Eduardo Barriobero: Las Luchas de un Jabalí” (Queimada Ediciones, 2017)

Análise da crise política do início da queda do governo Temer

Dès maintenant, passons de la défiance à la résistance sociale !

17 maggio, giornata internazionale contro l’omofobia.

Los Mártires de Chicago: historia de un crimen de clase en la tierra de la “democracia y la libertad”

Strike in Cachoeirinha

(Bielorrusia) ¡Libertad inmediata a nuestro compañero Mikola Dziadok!

DAF’ın Referandum Üzerine Birinci Bildirisi:

Cajamarca, Tolima: consulta popular y disputa por el territorio

© 2005-2017 Anarkismo.net. Unless otherwise stated by the author, all content is free for non-commercial reuse, reprint, and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere. Opinions are those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by Anarkismo.net. [ Disclaimer | Privacy ]